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Stories for January 2014

Wednesday, January 29

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My Walk Has Never Been Average

On stage with black women in non-traditional jobs

What is it like to be a black woman working in the construction trades in America? And if I’m not that woman, why should I care? How does her life impact mine? The answer to that question will become apparent when you join the August Wilson Red Door Project and Portland Playhouse.

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Through the Eyes of Africans

Cascade Festival of African Films to entertain and inform

Portland Community College's 24th Cascade Festival of African Films brings 19 films and two African directors

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Connecting with ‘Her’

Joaquin Phoenix navigates technology in search for love

A lovely and heartfelt film

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Portland Leader Improving Lives

Honored by Concordia University

Kay Toran, president and chief executive officer of Volunteers of America, will receive Concordia University’s 3rd Annual Gov. Victor Atiyeh Leadership in Education Award.

Wednesday, January 22

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And Then There Was 4

Bridge name finalists rooted in cultural significance

After a fierce search for the right name for the new light rail bridge under construction over the Willamette River, a committee of 10 has finally narrowed the list of possibilities to four names that meet criteria for cultural and geographic significance.

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Running for County Commissioner

Teressa Raiford kicks off election campaign

Teressa Raiford kicked off a new political campaign to the backdrop of heavy nostalgia, and promises of a stronger community should she be elected Multnomah County Commissioner this year. Raidford, a civil rights activist and north Portland business woman who ran for the Portland City Council two years ago, announced her candidacy for county commissioner on Wednesday, Jan. 15, Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday.

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Black History and Hip Hop Culture

Educator brings mobile museum to Jefferson

Scholar Khalid el-Hakim brought his Black History 101 Mobile Museum to Jefferson High School Thursday to help shine a light on how black history plays into the lyrics and images of hip-hop culture.

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August Wilson’s ‘Jitney’ Opens

Portland Playhouse presents its fifth production from August Wilson’s Pittsburgh Cycle: Jitney, a masterful, tension-filled play about a group of independent taxi drivers in a well-worn livery cab station in the mid-1970s.

Tuesday, January 21

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Everybody Reads First Hispanic Justice

Thousands of ‘My Beloved World’ distributed to schools, libraries

Multnomah County Library’s Everybody Reads 2014, the library’s 12th annual community reading project began last week with the distribution of thousands of copies of My Beloved World by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor to schools and libraries.

Wednesday, January 15

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Purveyor of African-American Pride

Joyce Harris reflects on King; service to the community

Decades ago, Harris left her African-American hub of Harlem, N.Y., for Portland, a town she had barely even heard of because of a free-ride scholarship at Reed College. Her review from the initial Rose City landing, “I hated it,” she says, pinpointing blame on culture shock, Reed students’ bohemian lifestyles, and the distance from her family. As she actively looked for a way to escape, she was stopped in her tracks by Portland activist Ron Herndon, currently the longtime director of Albina Head Start who was then working on another Portland project, the Black Education Center.

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Building Support for Revolution

Activist furthers Black empowerment tactics

In a land where sunny days and black bodies are sparse in numbers, California-bred activist Ahjamu Umi sees 35,000 rays of opportunity. The Portland transplant is leading a civil rights campaign in his new hometown with the recruitment of members to the All African Peoples Revolutionary Party (A-APRP).

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Fighting for Justice with Police Reforms

Portland Activist follows path of Martin Luther King Jr.

Too many lives have been cut short by violent confrontations with Portland Police and a northeast Portland activist has made it her mission to reform police department policies to bring about a change in the way police deal with the public, especially members of the African American and other minority communities. JoAnn Hardesty is a former state lawmaker whose mission of justice is to prevent any further officer-involved deaths while also keeping those who’ve passed alive in the hearts of their loved ones and the community.

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Make the Convention Center Hotel a Reality

Project would bring good jobs and grow local businesses

"For the past 20 plus years, there has been talk about the need for Portland to have a convention center headquarter hotel. Lack of political leadership in the past kept us on square one. Voters approved a beautiful multimillion dollar convention center that opened in 1990 that would be the epicenter of many future national meetings, conferences and conventions." --Roy Jay

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Dr. King’s Lessons for Climate Justice

A beloved community in which we are all interconnected

"Today, the annihilation of humanity looms again as a possibility because of climate change. In 1964, King could not have imagined the particular features of global environmental destruction that we now face. Yet, he had reflected carefully on the forms of action needed to avert mass extinction before, so his work can still be useful today in thinking about directions for the climate justice movement." Jose-Antonio Orosco

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Standing with Teachers

Students from Jefferson High School in north Portland take to the streets on Friday to support teachers and avert a strike in their contract negotiations with the Portland School District.

Tuesday, January 14

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Tony Dungy

Anthony Kevin "Tony" Dungy is a former professional American football player and coach in the National Football League. Dungy became the first African American head coach to win the Super Bowl when his Colts defeated the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI.

Friday, January 10

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Black Fashion Icons of the past 100 years

The past 100 years for people of color have been moving at the speed of light. I have identified a few of my favorite Black Fashion Icons of the past 100 years.

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3 Black-Owned Natural Hair And Beauty Brands That You Should Know

With the emergence of the natural hair movement and the infiltration of black beauty icons in mainstream media, came the proliferation of black-owned business with a purpose. Ones that used all natural ingredients, employed each other and sought to create solutions to their own beauty conundrums, and, in the process founded businesses. Such acts are worth celebrating and supporting.

Thursday, January 9

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5 Black Fashion Icons Who Influence Our Style

As black women continue to make strides in music, media and beauty, it’s worth noting that, in the process, their fashion sense serves to inspire our own style. Here are 5 black fashion icons that do this exactly right, every time.

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How to Redefine What It Means to be Beautiful

"Beautiful" - adjective - pleasing the senses or mind aesthetically. Of a very high standard; excellent.

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The Message in the Natural Hair Movement

"It's just hair." This is what people say who try to convince themselves that their hair doesn't somehow speak for them. As if its style, color and texture don't speak volumes about their personality, creativity, or disposition in general. While I reject the notion that hair completely defines a person, I strongly believe that it says something about one's state of mind and perhaps about society as a whole.

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Black Women’s Guide to Beautiful Skin

Mocha, caramel, almond—black women’s skin comes in many decadent shades. All of which call for proper skin care and pampering. While it has been said that black doesn’t crack, having a great skin care routine is a must if we want to ensure that our skin withstands the test of time. Today, I’ll share everything black women need to know to achieve and maintain beautiful skin.

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She's An Icon: Top 10 Black Women Who Are Making Black History Today

We all (hopefully) know the stellar history of our fore-mothers like Sojourner Truth, Phyllis Wheatley, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells, Fannie Lou Hammer, Dorothy Height and Lena Horne. But there are black women making moves today who are likely to join those names in our history books and become legends in their own right.

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Post-Obama: The Future of the Black Body Politic After the Age of Obama

When then Senator Barack Obama turned into President Barack Obama after his historic 2008 election it had all the pageantry, zeal and aura of a religious revelation for many. It was something a long time coming -- a win after a war that has been on-going for decades, centuries. But for all the pomp and excitement, it was short-lived. Once the party was over, on came the political hangover.

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To Assimilate or Infiltrate: The War for (and Against) Being Undeniably Black

When I was in the 9th grade I wrote a cartoon strip where the heroine’s name was Daphne. A white male classmate of mine who enjoyed reading my stories immediately complained that I’d give the girl a weird “black” name. I, politely, explained to him that the name was pronounced “Daff-nee” and that Daphne was a name from Greek mythology. Or, if that was too deep for him, a white female character from the cartoon “Scooby Doo.” No matter, to my “it’s all black names” to me friend. It was a weird name with a weird spelling, so it was a weird “black name.”

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Voting Rights: Under Threat Then, Still Under Threat Now

Georgia resident Dorothy Cooper had been voting for more than 50 years with no problem, but in 2012 she almost couldn’t. It was all due to the new voter ID law Georgia had passed under the guise of fighting voter fraud, but critics of the law said its real purpose was to make it harder for individuals like Cooper – the black, the poor and the elderly – to vote.

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Healthy Soul Food Exchanges that Work! | The Black American Kitchen

I have compiled 5 of my favorite Soul Food Exchanges so that you can maintain ethnic flavor when cooking Soul Food but not take in all of the sodium, fat or calories!

Wednesday, January 8

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African Influence in Fashion

Fashion is a 400 billion dollar industry in the US. Well-dressed celebrities like June Ambrose, Solange Knowles, and Tracee Ellis-Ross help to fuel the fashion obsession that helps to keep the sell of clothing and accessories on the rise. Let’s take a look at some designers that are helping to bring African culture and style to the forefront of the fashion industry.

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Recipe: Mama's Macaroni and Cheese

Macaroni and Cheese is a http://blackhistory2014.beta.lionheartdms.com/admin/news/story/add/#dish that is revered in the American Black kitchen. There are so many ways to make it and every recipe brings joy and delight to our taste buds.

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"Chitlin’s From Slave food to Delicacy | The Black American Kitchen

However you feel about them it is never dry or ho-hum. Either you love Chitlin's and the way that they taste or you cannot stand the smell or even the thought of what you may be eating. Everybody feels strongly one way or the other about the Southern Soul Food delicacy. Let's get into what they are where they came from and potentially where Chitlin’s are going.

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East County Uplift

Prominent youth programs coming to Gresham

The Rockwood neighborhood in Gresham will soon become home to two of the most prolific youth-service programs in the country.

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Tearing Up All Over Again

‘Saving Mr. Banks’ renews Mary Poppins charm

Opinionated Judge Darleen Ortega reviews the Disney blockbuster

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Black Music: Often Appropriated Can’t Be Duplicated

2013 could be considered the year where black music was not only heavily appropriated, but also appropriated to the point of no return.

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How Are Reality TV Shows Affecting Society’s Perception Of Black Women?

While Black women are clearly underrepresented in films and on prime time comedies and dramas, the same cannot be said of our representation on reality television. The sheer number of reality programs on television today makes it difficult to determine if we are in some way “overrepresented,” however, Black women have been entertaining American households through this genre from its inception and continue to do so today.

Monday, January 6

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Health, Heart and Soul

Inventive and smart ways to keep the soul in your food while incorporating heart-healthy methods into your cooking.

Wednesday, January 1

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10 auto-loving quotes from a man who devoted his life to car design

General Motors Vice President Edward T. Welburn shares his passion

Edward T. Welburn – most of us in the automotive industry may have heard the name – but let me introduce you to the legend. Welburn has been a General Motors employee for 35 years. He’s the current and first GM Vice President of Global Design. Yes, they actually created a VP position and title for him.