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Unique Literacy Space

Reading made more accessible at Rosa Parks

6/2/2015, 1:18 p.m.
An innovative new space designed for children with diverse learning needs is helping children at Rosa Parks Elementary concentrate on ...
Children at Rosa Parks School access a new online library which includes a new selection of high-interest, readable and multicultural books, thanks to a new literacy space created by the Shadow Product, a Portland non-profit working with Portland Public School’s ‘Read Together initiative.’ Mary Moore

An innovative new space designed for children with diverse learning needs is helping children at Rosa Parks Elementary concentrate on reading and other classroom tasks, setting an expectation that everyone can read and graduate.

Oregon’s first SuperSensory Literacy Space, created by the Portland nonprofit The Shadow Project, was unveiled May 19 at the north Portland school.

As part of the school district’s “Read Together initiative,” six reading and family organizations are providing students at five pilot schools with intensive, wrap-around literacy services.

The Shadow Project’s unique, compact, multisensory libraries are designed to help children with learning disabilities like dyslexia, ADHD and autism, utilizing more than 200 high-interest, highly readable, multicultural, and five-piece books sets for group lesson plans.

The pace also provides access to an audio library of more than 80,000 titles; a computer tablet and accessories; and multisensory tools to calm and or stimulate students, including fidgets, kinetic sand, weighted lap pads, and nubby-surfaced cushions.

The Shadow Project partners with special education teachers to close the achievement gap that separates children with disabilities from their peers. Vetted by the Harvard Business School Association of Oregon, the organization serves 1,500 children from kindergarten through eighth grade in 34 schools in Portland, East Multnomah and Yamhill Counties, and Hillsboro.