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King’s ‘Stand by Me’ Honored

3/31/2015, 4:28 p.m.
One of the most broadcast songs of the 20th century, Ben E. King's "Stand by Me," has been selected for ...
Ben E. King’s song ‘Stand by Me,’ has been named as one of the most culturally and historically significant recordings of all time.

(AP) - One of the most broadcast songs of the 20th century, Ben E. King's "Stand by Me," has been selected for preservation at the Library of Congress, along with recordings from Joan Baez, The Righteous Brothers, Steve Martin and the darker sounds of the band Radiohead.

Twenty-five sound recordings spanning from 1890 to 1999 were added last week to the library's National Recording Registry. Each year the library chooses recordings that are "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant."

Some of the unforgettable tunes being archived include "Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive" from Johnny Mercer in 1944, Baez's first solo album, The Righteous Brothers' "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" and Steve Martin's "A Wild and Crazy Guy" comedy album, which broke new ground in the 1970s as Martin broke out of formulaic jokes and punchlines for less predictable humor.

In the 1960s, King originally intended his song "Stand by Me" for his former group, the Drifters, but he ended up recording it himself. The song is anchored by one of the best-known bass lines in history, curators said. A few years later, The Righteous Brothers were recording "Lovin' Feelin.'" They thought the song was wrong for them at first but ended up with a hit.