Quantcast

A Place for All People

Poster exhibit is peak inside new national museum

12/12/2016, 3:52 p.m.
Oregon Historical Society presents a commemorative poster exhibition, “A Place for All People: Introducing the National Museum of African American ...
‘Revelations’ depicts some of the works inside the new National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. It’s part of a commemorative exhibition of posters from the museum on loan at the Oregon Historical Society.

The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. opened its newest museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture in September. Now there’s an opportunity in Portland to get a virtual peek inside the museum as the Oregon Historical Society presents a commemorative poster exhibition, “A Place for All People: Introducing the National Museum of African American History and Culture. The new exhibit will be on view until Jan. 16.

A Place for All People highlights key artifacts that tell the rich and diverse story of the African American experience.

From the child-size shackles of a slave, to the clothing worn by Carolotta Walls on her first day at Little Rock Central High School, to Chuck Berry's Gibson guitar, "Maybellene," and the track shoes worn by Olympian Carl Lewis, the exhibition presents a living history that reflects challenge, triumph, faith, and hope.

The poster exhibition will share many stories of African American and African diaspora people and their contributions to the local community and the American story.

"Once we saw the quality and poignant content in these posters, we knew that this exhibit and the work of the National Museum of African American History had to be shared with Oregonians," said Willie Richardson, President of the Oregon Black Pioneers. "In the past few years, have created three original exhibitions that have been showcased at the Oregon Historical Society, so it seemed like the perfect venue to exhibit these powerful posters."

"The Oregon Historical Society has been proud to partner with the Oregon Black Pioneers on a series of original exhibits that share the important histories of Oregon's Black communities," said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. "The stories and artifacts on view at the National Museum of African American History are critical pieces of American history, and we are delighted that the Oregon Black Pioneers reached out to us to host this important exhibit."

The journey to establish this museum began a century ago with a call for a national memorial to honor the contributions of African American Civil War veterans. After decades of efforts by private citizens, organizations, and members of Congress, federal legislation was passed in 2003 to create the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Since then, thousands of artifacts have been collected to fill the inspiring new building that has risen on the National Mall.