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Tips to Beat the Heat

Kay Newell “the Lightbulb Lady” | 8/8/2018, 11 a.m.
For both homes lucky enough to have air conditioning and those without, you can do a few things to stay ...

August is spelled hot. The long, warm days of summer are great for growing your garden, necessary for grains to ripen and plants to mature. Farmers depend on it. In the city, the same heat bounces off sidewalks, streets and buildings, trapping heat close to the ground and slowing the cooling at night. Our homes collect summer heat through window glass, open doors, and standard light bulbs.

For both homes lucky enough to have air conditioning and those without, you can do a few things to stay cooler. Keep blinds and curtains closed all day. Open the windows at night, 4 inches on the top and bottom to let cool night air enter and warm hot air move out. Use a child safety device to prevent the window opening more than 4 inches.

Other ways to keep cool is to use wet sheets or towels and hang them to dry cool the air in the area you are resting. Let your children play in a wet tent. A pan of cool water is great to soak hot feet and make your body feel cooler as does a wet cloth around the neck.

A pan of ice in front of a fan blows cooler air.

You can reduce heat created inside of the home by doing less cooking. Eat salads, fresh raw fruits and veggies and foods that do not require heating up.

Remember to keep all electrical devices off when you are not using then. Lights should be turned off unless they are LED. LED lights use about 1/10 the power of incandescent lamps. They produce very little heat to create light.

Sunlan Lighting at 3901 N. Mississippi Ave. has LED bulbs that look like standard A19 or flood lights which produce a light that is very close to the familiar incandescent light bulb and has a color rendering of 90 percent natural light.