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When Joseph “King J” Harris received a court order to remove all the possessions from the outdoor areas of his home because of a nuisance complaint, he thought it fit into a pattern of historic racism against African Americans. Harris pointed to three initials that looked like KKK to the right of the judge’s printed name and was upset. The Portland Observer brought the document to the attention of the court and found the letters might be KRR, the actual initials of a court clerk who works for the judge.

When Joseph “King J” Harris received a court order to remove all the possessions from the outdoor areas of his home because of a nuisance complaint, he thought it fit into a pattern of historic racism against African Americans. Harris pointed to three initials that looked like KKK to the right of the judge’s printed name and was upset. The Portland Observer brought the document to the attention of the court and found the letters might be KRR, the actual initials of a court clerk who works for the judge.

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